Mathematics

Mathematics
  • The study of mathematics is a fundamental part of a balanced education. It promotes a powerful universal language, analytical reasoning and problem-solving skills that contribute to the development of logical, abstract and critical thinking. Mathematics can help make sense of the world and allows phenomena to be described in precise terms. It also promotes careful analysis and the search for patterns and relationships, skills necessary for success both inside and outside the classroom. Mathematics, then, should be accessible to and studied by all students.

    Studying mathematics, however, should be more than simply learning formulae or rules. Students should not have the impression that all of the answers to mathematics can be found in a book but, rather, that they can be active participants in the search for concepts and relationships. In that light, mathematics becomes a subject that is alive with the thrill of exploration and the rewards of discovery. At the same time, that new knowledge may then be applied to other situations, opening up even more doors for students.

    Mathematics promotes both inquiry and application, helping students to develop problem-solving techniques that transcend the discipline and that are useful in the world outside school.

    A mathematics programme should be tailored to the needs of students, seeking to intrigue and motivate them to want to learn its principles. Students should see authentic examples of how mathematics is useful and relevant to their lives and be encouraged to apply it to new situations. Mathematics provides the foundation for the study of sciences, engineering and technology. However, it is also evident in the arts and is increasingly important in economics, the social sciences and the structure of language. Students are encouraged to use ICT tools to represent information, to explore and model situations, and to find solutions to various problems. These are skills that are useful in a wide range of arenas. Mathematics aims to equip all students with the knowledge, understanding and intellectual capabilities to address further courses in mathematics, as well as to prepare those students who will use mathematics in their studies, workplaces and lives in general.

    __________
    IB Middle Years Programme | Mathematics guide (2014)

Courses Offered

  • Fundamental/Introductory Mathematics
  • Foundations of Math
  • NC Math 1
  • Math Plus / NC Math 2
  • NC Math 2
  • NC Math 3
  • Essentials of College Math
  • Advanced Functions and Modeling
  • Pre-Calculus
  • AP Calculus AB
  • AP Calculus BC
  • AP Statistics
  • IB Computer Science SL*
*May be taken as an elective by non-Diploma Programme candidates
  • Mathematics Courses

    Fundamental Math 1/ Introductory Mathematics Credit Type: Standard
    Prerequisite: NoneRecommended for Students scoring less than a 2.0 on the 8th Grade EOG test for Math

    This courses provides learners with an opportunity to review and study foundational topics for higher-level mathematics. Topics include: working with different forms of numbers (rates, ratios, fractions, percents); exponents and exponential notation; solving percent problems using proportions; integers; square roots; simplifying numerical and algebraic expressions; linear relationships; simplifying expressions and solving one-variable equations and inequalities; one-variable statistics; different representation of functions; linear functions; the Pythagorean theorem; volume; solving systems of linear equations; graphing line of best fit; and operations with polynomials. Students will solve relevant and authentic problems using manipulative and appropriate technology.

    Foundations of NC Math 1/ NC Math 1(b) Credit Type: Standard
    Prerequisite: NoneRecommended for Students scoring a 2.0-2.9 on the 8th Grade EOG test for Math

    The purpose of this course is to formalize and extend the mathematics that students learned in the middle grades. This course deepens and extends understanding of linear relationships, in part by contrasting them with exponential and quadratic phenomena, and in part by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend. In addition to studying bivariate data, students also summarize, represent, and interpret data on a single count or measurement variable. The Geometry standards that appear in this course formalize and extend students’ geometric experiences to explore more complex geometric situations and deepen their explanations of geometric relationships, moving towards formal mathematical arguments. The Standards for Mathematical Practice apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, require that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. This course fulfills the North Carolina high school graduation requirement for Math I. The final exam is the North Carolina End-of-Course Test based on the Math 1 Standards.

    NC Math 1 Credit Type: Standard
    Prerequisite: Mastery of the middle school mathematics curriculumRecommended for

    The purpose of this course is to formalize and extend the mathematics that students learned in the middle grades. This course deepens and extends understanding of linear relationships, in part by contrasting them with exponential and quadratic phenomena, and in part by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend. In addition to studying bivariate data, students also summarize, represent, and interpret data on a single count or measurement variable. The Geometry standards that appear in this course formalize and extend students’ geometric experiences to explore more complex geometric situations and deepen their explanations of geometric relationships, moving towards formal mathematical arguments. The Standards for Mathematical Practice apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, require that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. This course fulfills the North Carolina high school graduation requirement for Common Core Math I. The final exam is the North Carolina End-of-Course Test based on the Common Core Math 1 Standards.

    Math Plus / NC Math 2 Credit Type: Honors
    Prerequisite: Math 1Recommended for Students scoring less than a 3.5 on the Math I EOC exam or earning a C or D in Math 1 in the 8th Grade

    Math Plus deepens the understanding of mathematical concepts covered in Math I to ensure that students are successful in future math courses that involve the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics. Students will be exposed to the content of Math I to reinforce crucial skills needed for Honors level courses. Students will also preview content for Honors Math II.

    NC Math 2 Credit Type: Standard / Honors
    Prerequisite: Math IRecommended for

    In Math II, students continue to deepen their study of quadratic expressions, equations, and functions; comparing their characteristics and behavior to those of linear and exponential relationships from Math I. The concept of quadratics is generalized with the introduction of higher degree polynomials. New methods for solving quadratic and exponential equations are developed. The characteristics of advanced types of functions are investigated (including power, inverse variation, radical, absolute value, piecewise-defined, and simple trigonometric functions). The link between probability and data is explored through conditional probability and counting methods. Students explore more complex geometric situations and deepen their explanations of geometric relationships, moving towards formal mathematical arguments. Important differences exist between Math II and the historical approach taken in Geometry classes. For example, transformations are explored early in the course and provide the framework for studying geometric concepts such as similarity and congruence. The study of similarity leads to an understanding of right triangle trigonometry and connects to quadratics through Pythagorean relationships. The Standards for Mathematical Practice apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, require that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. The Honors level of this courses explores content at a more rigorous level to begin students’ preparation for advanced math courses. This course fulfills the North Carolina high school graduation requirement for Math II. The final exam is the North Carolina Final Exam for Math II.

    NC Math 3 Credit Type: Standard / Honors
    Prerequisite: Math IIRecommended for

    This course is designed so that students have the opportunity to pull together and apply the accumulation of mathematics concepts learned previously. They apply methods from probability and statistics to draw inferences and conclusions from data. Students expand their repertoire of functions to include polynomial, rational, and radical functions, including an intense study of families of functions and the relationships therein. They expand their study of right triangle trigonometry to include general triangles and in the study of trigonometric functions to model simple periodic phenomena. Finally, students bring together all of their experience with functions and geometry to create models and solve contextual problems. Appropriate technology and tools, including manipulatives and calculators, will be used regularly for instruction and assessment. The Standard for Mathematical Practice apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, require that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that means use of their ability to make sense of problems situations. The Honors level of this courses explores content at a more rigorous level to continue students’ preparation for advanced math courses. This course fulfills the North Carolina high school graduation requirement for Math III. The final exam is the North Carolina Final Exam for Math III.

    Essentials For College Math (SREB) Credit Type: Standard
    Prerequisite: Math IIIRecommended for

    Concepts explored in this course include exponentials, quadratics, equations, measurement, number operations, systems, linear functions, and statistics. Emphasis is on understanding mathematics concepts rather than just memorizing procedures. Students will learn the context behind procedures: for example, why they should use a certain formula or method to solve a problem. This equips them with higher-order thinking skills enabling them to apply math skills, functions, and concepts in different situations. Additionally, students are prepared for college level math assignments. This course is accepted as the fourth math for admission to UNC System institutions.

    Advanced Functions And Modeling Credit Type: Standard
    Prerequisite: Math IIIRecommended for

    Advanced Functions and Modeling provides students an in-depth study of modeling and applying functions, probability, statistics, trigonometry, financial literacy. Appropriate technology, from manipulatives to calculators and application software, are used regularly for instruction and assessment. Advanced Functions and Modeling is not an honors level course. This course is accepted as the fourth math for admission to UNC System institutions.

    Precalculus Credit Type: Honors
    Prerequisite: Honors Math IIIRecommended for

    The Precalculus curriculum includes a complete study of trigonometry, as well as advanced algebra topics, analytic geometry, sequences and series, data analysis, vectors, and limits. Applications and modeling are included throughout the course of study. Appropriate technology, from manipulatives to calculators and application software, is used for instruction and assessment. This course is accepted as the fourth math for admission to UNC System institutions.

    Advanced Placement Calculus: AB Credit Type: AP
    Prerequisite: Mastery of the Precalculus curriculumRecommended for

    The AP Calculus curriculum includes limits, continuity, derivatives with applications, and elementary integration with applications. This is a college-level course. Use of computers and graphing calculators play an important role in this course. For each session of classroom instruction the student is expected to spend, as a minimum, an equal amount of time outside the classroom for review, written assignments, and preparation. It is expected that students enrolled in this course will take the College Board Advanced Placement Exam. This course is accepted as the fourth math for admission to UNC System institutions.

    Advanced Placement Calculus: BC Credit Type: AP
    Prerequisite: AP Calculus ABRecommended for

    The BC level of AP Calculus revisits some topics introduced in the AB course. Topics include differentials, integrals, infinite series, and differential equations. In addition, the curriculum for this course includes convergence and divergence of sequences and series, parametric representation of curves, polar curves, and additional integration techniques. This is a college-level course. Use of computers and graphing calculators play an important role in this course. For each session of classroom instruction, the student is expected to spend, as a minimum, an equal amount of time outside the classroom for review, written assignments, and preparation. It is expected that students enrolled in this course will take the College Board Advanced Placement Exam. This course is accepted as the fourth math for admission to UNC System institutions.

    Advanced Placement Statistics Credit Type: AP
    Prerequisite: Honors Math III or Advanced Functions and ModelingRecommended for

    The AP Statistics curriculum is divided into four major themes: exploratory analysis, planning a study, probability, and statistical inference. This is a college-level course. Use of computers and graphing calculators play an important role in this course. For each session of classroom instruction, the student is expected to spend, as a minimum, an equal amount of time outside the classroom for review, written assignments, and preparation. It is expected that students enrolled in this course will take the College Board Advanced Placement Exam. This course is accepted as the fourth math for admission to UNC System institutions.

    AP Computer Science Credit Type: Standard
    Prerequisite: NoneRecommended for

    This is a college-level introductory course in computer science. Because the design and implementation of computer programs to solve problems involves skills that are fundamental to the study of computer science, a large part of the course is built around the development of computer programs that correctly solve a given problem. These programs should be understandable, adaptable, and when appropriate, reusable. At the same time, the design and implementation of computer programs is used as a context for introducing other important aspects of computer science, including the development and analysis of algorithms, the development and use of fundamental data structures, the study of standard algorithms and typical applications, and the use of logic and formal methods. In addition, the responsible use of these systems is an integral part of the course. The course is designed to be the equivalent of a first-semester college course in computer science. Mathematics is reinforced throughout the course. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include apprenticeship, cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing. Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.