English Language and Literature

English Language Arts
  • Language is fundamental to learning, thinking and communicating; therefore it permeates the whole curriculum. Indeed, all teachers are language teachers, continually expanding the boundaries of what students are thinking about. Mastery of one or more languages enables each student to achieve their full linguistic potential.

    Students need to develop an appreciation of the nature of language and literature, of the many influences on language and literature, and of its power and beauty. They will be encouraged to recognize that proficiency in language is a powerful tool for communication in all societies. Furthermore, language and literature incorporates creative processes and encourages the development of imagination and creativity through self-expression.

    All IB programmes value language as central to developing critical thinking, which is essential for the cultivation of intercultural understanding, as well as for becoming internationally minded and responsible members of local, national and global communities. Language is integral to exploring and sustaining personal development and cultural identity, and provides an intellectual framework to support conceptual development. The six skill areas in the IB language and literature subject group—listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing and presenting—develop as both independent and interdependent skills. They are centred within an inquiry-based learning environment. Inquiry is at the heart of IB language learning, and aims to support students’ understanding by providing them with opportunities to independently and collaboratively investigate, take action and reflect.

    As well as being academically rigorous, MYP language and literature equips students with linguistic, analytical and communicative skills that can also be used to develop interdisciplinary understanding across all other subject groups. Students’ interaction with chosen texts can generate insight into moral, social, economic, political, cultural and environmental factors and so contributes to the development of opinion forming, decision-making and ethical-reasoning skills, and further develops the attributes of an IB learner.


    IB Middle Years Programme | Language and literature guide (2014)

Courses Offered

Required Courses

  • English I
  • Paideia English I
  • English II
  • Paideia English II
  • English III
  • English IV
  • AP English III – Language and Composition
  • AP English IV – Literature and Composition
  • IB English Literature HL

Electives

  • African American Literature
  • Creative Writing I
  • Creative Writing II
  • Shakespeare
  • Speech I
  • Speech II
  • Trends & Movements: Young Adult Literature
  • Yearbook/Newspaper (2 credits)

English Language and Literature Courses

Required Courses

  • English I Credit Type: Standard
    Prerequisite: NoneRecommended for Grade 9

    This academic course is designed for the student who aspires to post-secondary college or career experience. A survey of literary types, this course focuses on reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language. Students should expect homework assignments and/or compositions that reinforce classroom instruction. Writing instruction at this level focuses on mechanical correctness, fluency, and structure. The student is expected to function at grade level in communication and thinking skills.

    English I (Honors) Credit Type: Honors
    Prerequisite: NoneRecommended for Grade 9

    This honors course is designed to challenge students. It concentrates on developing reading, writing, and critical thinking skills through an intensive survey of literary types and appropriate oral and written responses. The course provides a review of grammar, mechanics, vocabulary, and usage as needed. This college preparatory course focuses on the development of complex thought processes, independence in learning, and creative expression through discussion and frequent writing assignments. Homework is a reinforcement and extension of classroom instruction.

    Paideia I | English I & World History Credit Type: Honors
    Prerequisite: NoneRecommended for Grade 9

    The Paideia Program, an interdisciplinary approach that is part of a comprehensive program drawn from The Paideia Proposal, encourages students to think across subject areas and curriculum boundaries. These courses develop students' critical and analytical thinking skills. Great classics, modern works of literature, and original documents are studied within the appropriate historical framework. Teachers use traditional didactic means, weekly seminars, and supervised practice referred to as coaching. The Paideia Program is a two-credit course that covers the English and social studies requirements at each grade level. Students must also register for the corresponding Paideia social studies course

    English II Credit Type: Standard
    Prerequisite: English IRecommended for Grade 10

    This academic world literature course is designed for the student who aspires to post-secondary college or career experience. This class focuses on reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language. Students should expect homework assignments and/or compositions that reinforce classroom instruction. Writing instruction at this level focuses on mechanical correctness, fluency, and structure. The student is expected to function at grade level in communication and thinking skills.

    English II (Honors) Credit Type: Honors
    Prerequisite: English IRecommended for Grade 10

    This honors course is designed to challenge students. This course concentrates on developing reading, writing, and critical thinking skills through an intensive study of a variety of selected world literature and appropriate oral and written responses. The course provides a review of grammar, mechanics, vocabulary, and usage as needed. This college preparatory course focuses on the development of complex thought processes, independence in learning, and creative expression through discussion and frequent writing assignments. Homework is a reinforcement and extension of classroom instruction.

    Paideia II | English II & Civics and Economics Credit Type: Honors
    Prerequisite: English IRecommended for Grade 10

    The Paideia Program, an interdisciplinary approach that is part of a comprehensive program drawn from The Paideia Proposal, encourages students to think across subject areas and curriculum boundaries. These courses develop students' critical and analytical thinking skills. Great classics, modern works of literature, and original documents are studied within the appropriate historical framework. Teachers use traditional didactic means, weekly seminars, and supervised practice referred to as coaching. The Paideia Program is a two-credit course that covers the English and social studies requirements at each grade level. Students must also register for the corresponding Paideia social studies course.

    English III Credit Type: Standard
    Prerequisite: English IIRecommended for Grade 11

    This academic American literature course is designed for the student who aspires to post-secondary college or vocational experience. The course addresses reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language. Students should expect homework assignments and/or compositions that reinforce classroom instruction. Writing instruction at this level focuses on mechanical correctness, fluency, and structure. The student is expected to function at grade level in communication and thinking skills.

    English III (Honors) Credit Type: Honors
    Prerequisite: English IIRecommended for Grade 11

    This honors course is designed to challenge students. This course concentrates on developing reading, writing, and critical thinking skills through an intensive study of selected American literature and appropriate oral and written responses. The course provides a review of grammar, mechanics, vocabulary, and usage as needed. This college preparatory course focuses on the development of complex thought processes, independence in learning, and creative expression through discussion and frequent writing assignments. Homework is a reinforcement and extension of classroom instruction.

    Advanced Placement English Language And Composition Credit Type: AP
    Prerequisite: English II, Honors-level recommendedRecommended for Grade 11

    This college-level course provides an analytical and historical study of American literature and language as well as other literature in a comprehensive program of reading, writing, and critical thinking. As preparation to take the Advanced Placement Test in Language and Composition, students read, discuss, analyze, and write about challenging works of recognized literary merit to develop honest, concise, and effective use of language and the ability to organize ideas in a clear, coherent, and persuasive way. Independent literary analysis and a total mastery of writing skills are goals of the course. Because this course meets the needs of academically gifted or highly motivated advanced students who hope to bypass introductory courses in composition and literature when they enter college, students in an AP course should expect assignments and instruction paced at the college level. Students enrolled in this course are expected to take The College Board Advanced Placement Test.

    English IV Credit Type: Standard
    Prerequisite: English IIIRecommended for Grade 12

    This academic British literature course is designed for the student who aspires to post-secondary college or career experience. The course addresses reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language. Students should expect homework assignments and/or compositions that reinforce classroom instruction. Writing instruction at this level focuses on mechanical correctness, fluency, and structure. The student is expected to function at grade level in communication and thinking skills.

    English IV (Honors) Credit Type: Honors
    Prerequisite: English IIIRecommended for Grade 12

    This honors course is designed to challenge students. This course concentrates on developing reading, writing, and critical thinking skills through an intensive study of selected British literature and appropriate oral and written responses. The course provides a review of grammar, mechanics, vocabulary, and usage as needed. This college preparatory course focuses on the development of complex thought processes, independence in learning, and creative expression through discussion and frequent writing assignments. Homework is a reinforcement and extension of classroom instruction.

    Advanced Placement English Literature And Composition Credit Type: AP
    Prerequisite: English III, Honors-level recommendedRecommended for Grade 12

    This college-level course provides an analytical and historical study of British and world literature in a comprehensive program of reading, writing, and critical thinking. As preparation to take the Advanced Placement Test in Literature and Composition, students read, discuss, analyze, and write about challenging works of recognized literary merit to develop honest, concise, and effective use of language and the ability to organize ideas in a clear, coherent, and persuasive way. Independent literary analysis and a total mastery of writing skills are goals of the course. Because this course meets the needs of academically gifted or highly motivated advanced students who hope to bypass introductory courses in composition and literature when they enter college, students in an AP course should expect assignments and instruction paced at the college level. Students enrolled in this course are expected to take The College Board Advanced Placement test.

Electives

  • African American Literature Credit Type: Standard / Honors
    Prerequisite: NoneRecommended for Grades 10-12

    This literature-based course is intended for those students interested in a deep and extended exploration of African American writing and its relationship to American history and culture. Students can expect to study a survey of the African American experience, from colonial voices through urban fiction, poetry, and music lyrics. A deep study of critical theories and their application to African American literature uses a variety of African American sources as text for this course.

    Creative Writing I Credit Type: Standard / Honors
    Prerequisite: NoneRecommended for Grades 10-12

    In this course, students will study the elements of creative expression and production through mentor texts and original poetry, short story, memoir, drama, and essay. Students will use a writer's workshop course structure of self- and peer- evaluation and multiple revisions to produce publishable works of literature. Students will be expected to develop an extended project of work over time, responding to feedback and revising for a specific audience, such as a school literary magazine.

    Creative Writing II Credit Type: Standard / Honors
    Prerequisite: Creative Writing IRecommended for Grades 11-12

    This course is designed for students interested in exploring the Creative Writing II curriculum at a more intensive and extensive level. Students taking this course for Honors CREDIT must write extended and polished responses to course assignments, participate in peer review panels, and submit manuscripts for publication. They may also be expected to participate in local publication of a school literary magazine.

    Newspaper / Yearbook Credit Type: Standard / Honors
    Prerequisites: Application and Teacher RecommendationRecommended for Grades 11-12

    This two-credit course offers the student total involvement in the production of the school newspaper and yearbook. The course designed to help students refine their skills in copywriting, proofing, photography, and layout planning. In addition to development of higher level writing skills and business management procedures, students enhance their knowledge of the laws and ethics of journalism. The technological skills include mastering advanced layout and design of desktop publishing and mastering digital imagery and photo placement. Student in the upper levels of this course are required to fill an editor's position or take a leadership role on the publication staff. Newspaper editorial skills include planning an entire newspaper issue, copy editing, and completing portfolios of their work. Yearbook editors plan a yearbook ladder, complete various spreads and assignments, and complete a portfolio of work.

    Shakespeare Credit Type: Standard / Honors
    Prerequisites: English I and IIRecommended for Grades 10-12

    This course provides students the opportunity to expand their knowledge of Shakespeare’s plays through in-depth study and analysis of selected Shakespearean histories, comedies, and tragedies. Students also research the classical origins of Shakespearean works, Shakespeare’s influences on Western literature and culture, and relevant contemporary criticism of his dramas.

    Speech I Credit Type: Standard / Honors
    Prerequisite: NoneRecommended for Grades 10-12

    This course is designed for students interested in exploring the Speech I curriculum at a more intensive and extensive level. Students taking this course for Honors CREDIT must write and deliver deeply considered and polished responses to course assignments, participate in peer review panels, and extend their thinking through preparing presentations that fulfill fundamental standards for selected events promoted by the National Forensics League.

    Speech II Credit Type: Standard / Honors
    Prerequisite: Speech I HonorsRecommended for Grades 10-12

    This course hones public speaking skills so that students may more rewardingly engage in competitive speaking and debate. Class activities are modeled on local, statewide, and national events expected by the National Forensics League. Included are dramatic and humorous interpretation of poetry and prose, student Congress, public forum and Lincoln-Douglas debate, extemporaneous speaking, and original oratory. Students who belong to a Speech and Debate Team will greatly benefit from this course, but all students who want to take their skills to the next level would derive much benefit and pleasure. Students taking this course for Honors CREDIT must write and deliver deeply considered and polished responses to course assignments, participate in peer review panels, and extend their thinking through preparing presentations that fulfill fundamental standards for selected events promoted by the National Forensics League. In the process of honing their skills, students will be expected to delve more deeply into the art of argumentation and the resources available through advanced research.

    Trends And Movements In Young Adult Literature Credit Type: Standard
    Prerequisite: NoneRecommended for Grades 10-12

    This survey course on the development and changing visions of Young Adult Literature examines themes and trends in literature that has been written specifically for teens. Students read young adult novels, drama, short stories, and poetry. They participate in literature circles, write analyses of works, do research, and develop projects.