•  Digital Video Image DIGITAL VIDEO CONTENT

    • Common Sense Media:  https://www.youtube.com/user/CommonSenseEducators  You may be familiar with Common Sense Media’s digital citizenship curriculum and their YouTube channel has lots of resources too. The short clips on different topics like oversharing and posting online are perfect for teachable moments in your classroom.
    • Crash Course:  https://www.youtube.com/user/crashcourse  This YouTube channel includes videos that provide an introduction to different topics. They have a section on Economics, Chemistry, and plenty of Social Studies topics. These videos are around 10-15 minutes and includes speakers and animation.
    • Discovery Networks:  https://www.youtube.com/user/DiscoveryNetworks  I recently featured some fantastic virtual reality videos from Discovery but their YouTube channel is equally awesome. Quick clips from MythBusters or Racing Extinction can kick off a new lesson or energize students mid-unit.
    • Education Week:  https://www.youtube.com/user/educationweek  On this YouTube channel teachers can find information on new education initiatives and interviews with educators. It’s a great space for inspiration or clarification on big ideas.
    • Smithsonian Education:  https://www.youtube.com/user/SmithsonianEducation  With videos for teachers and students this channel has lots to choose from. You’ll find Online Conference Series on topics like Climate Change and Diplomacy in Action. There are also short clips on events like The March on Washington that include historian interviews and primary source documents
    • TEDEd:  https://www.youtube.com/user/TEDEducation What I love most about TED-Ed videos are how they address questions from our everyday lives. Topics include “Does grammar matter?” and “What are those floaty things in your eyes?” This is a great place to find resources that connect to the real world.
    • Videolicious:  http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/videolicious/id400853498?mt=8&ign-mpt=uo%3D8  Students can make documentary and news segment style films with Videolicious (Links to an external site.)  Students can record themselves giving a short introduction and then easily cut to a series of images and videos. The filming can return back to the student who can then record a short conclusion.The free version of Videolicious has a time limit of 60 seconds. The time constraint can actually push students to include only the most important or interesting details. The other constraint placed on the free version is that each video can have up to 10 shots per video. Videolicious can save to the Camera Roll, allowing the video to be used in other apps and shared in a variety of ways.Videos made with Videolicious can be fantastic for making how to videos, book reviews, field trip documentation, chapter summaries, public service announcements, science lab recaps, and vocabulary explanations.